Volume 34 (2020) RSS feed for this section

Negotiating Structural Vulnerability in Cancer Control

Carlo Caduff Negotiating Structural Vulnerability in Cancer Control highlights the continuing lack of equity in cancer care. At the heart of the essays assembled in this volume are two questions: “What can case studies about the lived experiences of and discourses related to cancer contribute to the burgeoning interest in the concept of structural vulnerability? […]

Continue Reading ·

Psychiatric Encounters: Madness and Modernity in Yucatan, Mexico

It is relatively easy to critique biomedicine—perhaps especially institutional psychiatry—as a form of social control, as a crucial cog in the system of neoliberal governmentality. It is much harder to write a compassionate clinical ethnography that does justice to patients, practitioners, and institutions and that has historical depth and contemporary valence. And it is nearly […]

Continue Reading ·

Threshold: Emergency Responders on the US‐Mexico Border

Wendy Vogt There is perhaps no border in the world that had garnered more scholarly, journalistic or political attention than the U.S.–Mexico border. More than simply a geo–political boundary, the U.S.–Mexico border is an intensive site of cultural and economic exchange, natural biodiversity, and political spectacle. It is also a site of conquest, violence, and […]

Continue Reading ·

State of Health: Pleasure and Politics in Venezuelan Health Care under Chávez

Lynn M. Morgan State of Health: Pleasure and Politics in Venezuelan Health Care under Chávez is an accessible, eminently teachable book set in Venezuela at the height of the Bolivarian revolution. It was 2006–2009, a time of widespread hope and optimism. High prices for oil, Venezuela’s major export, allowed then-President Hugo Chávez to expand social […]

Continue Reading ·

Romancing the Sperm: Shifting Biopolitics and the Making of Modern Families

For the last few decades, anthropologists have made key contributions to scholarship on the sociocultural implications of assisted reproductive technologies. This work provides critical ethnographic insights into ongoing debates around changing meanings of family, parenthood, and life itself. In Romancing the Sperm, Diane Tober offers a refreshing take on one such assisted reproductive technology—sperm donation—by […]

Continue Reading ·