Reflecting on “#MeToo Meets Global Health: A call to action”

by Rachel Hall-Clifford (Agnes Scott College) and Arachu Castro (Tulane University) Within global health, we rarely discuss gender-based violence that occurs during fieldwork—even among those of us who study gender-based violence.  It becomes a different phenomenon when we have experienced it firsthand. In April 2018, during the Workshop on Ethically Managing Risk in Global Health […]

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Remarks on “#MeToo Meets Global Health: Gatekeepers and Missing Women

by Kimberly Theidon (Tufts University) I was pleased to be invited to provide remarks on “#MeToo Meets Global Health: A Call to Action.”  I approach the topic as someone who has been active in addressing campus sexual assault and harassment, and believe that many of the same factors that allow universities to remain sites of […]

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Anthropology and (Feminist) Collective Action: Naming and Eliminating Sexual Harassment in Anthropology and Global Health

by Gelya Frank (University of Southern California) The April 2019 Statement by Participants of the Global Health Fieldwork Ethics Workshop led by anthropology and public health scholars Rachel Hall-Clifford (Agnes Scott College) and Arachu Castro (Tulane University) makes a significant contribution to anthropology’s self-awareness as a profession and expectations for ethical conduct.[1] The Statement calls […]

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A Response to #MeToo Meets Global Health: A Call to Action

by Elizabeth Wirtz (Purdue University) The age of #MeToo calls for not only increased recognition of the pervasiveness of gender-based violence (GBV), but also concerted and sustained efforts to address the causes of and potential solutions to GBV. #MeToo Meets Global Health: A Call to Action exemplifies the type of public and collaborative work that […]

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Apply Within! MAQ Book Reviews Editor

Call for Applications: Medical Anthropology Quarterly Book Reviews Editor   Medical Anthropology Quarterly invites applications for the position of Book Reviews Editor. This is a three-year appointment, starting in January 2020. The Book Reviews Editor is responsible for the intake and cataloging of all volumes received from publishers; for identifying books appropriate for the journal; […]

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US Military Burn Pits and the Politics of Health

by Kenneth MacLeish, Medicine, Health, and Society and Anthropology at Vanderbilt University and Zoë H. Wool, Department of Anthropology, Rice University   On June 7, the House Committee on Veterans Affairs (HCVA) held the first ever hearing on the health effects of the US military’s overseas burn pits. Most Americans have never heard of a burn […]

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The Anthropology of “Boring” Things

Curated by Marieke van Eijk, University of Washington       Stacks of unbillable patient visits. Insurance cards. Medical codes. Telephones. Frequently Asked Questions databases. These objects do not often spike people’s imagination and are easily reduced to being merely “boring.” Often times such “boring” objects like paperwork, tax returns, standards, plugs, and labels are […]

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Financial Stories of “Boring” Medical Codes

by Marieke van Eijk, University of Washington In her TED talk, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie warns of the Dangers of a Single Story (https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story/transcript). She talks about her childhood growing up in Nigeria and of Fide, her family’s house boy. Her mother had told her that Fide’s family was poor. When Adichie visited Fide’s village she […]

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The Heavy Boredom of Medical Infrastructure

by Michael Esveldt, University of Washington Life, friends, is boring. We must not say so. After all, the sky flashes, the great sea yearns, we ourselves flash and yearn, and moreover my mother told me as a boy (repeatingly) ‘Ever to confess you’re bored means you have no Inner Resources.’ I conclude now I have […]

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The Voice of the Phone Tree

by Shannon Satterwhite, UCSF San Francisco Fieldnote, Primary Care Clinic, Monday Morning: I am sitting in the nurses’ station, which holds three computers and a printer, as well as cupboards of supplies. The space is narrow and I am only a few feet behind two of the registered nurses who work side by side at […]

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