New at MAQ!

Have you heard about Lissa, the ethno-graphic collaboration between medical anthropologists Sherine Hamdy and Coleman Nye? The story follows an American and an Egyptian girl in Cairo who navigate class difference, revolutionary struggle, family health crises, and medical uncertainty. The book offers an exciting new way to teach medical anthropology, and is filled with resources […]

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Lissa: A Review

By Parismita Singh                                                   Who is the reader and who the reviewer? A question taken seriously by the graphic novel Lissa.  The reader (or so it seems to the me) is […]

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Things Anthropologists Can Do With Comics

by Stacy Leigh Pigg Comics, says literary scholar Hillary Chute (2011: 112), are “about bodies – about locating them in space and time.” Comics engage the body regardless of their theme, and this kind of engagement inspires the project that is Lissa: A Story about Medical Promise, Friendship, and Revolution. In the book’s Foreword, George […]

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Review – Lissa: A story about medical promise, friendship, and revolution.

by Lochlann Jain For several years I taught course based largely on graphic novels at Stanford – twice in a medical anthropology graduate seminar and once for undergraduates at the Stanford school in Paris (we took a field-trip to the famous international festival for bande dessinee in Angouleme). As teaching devices, graphic novels provide an […]

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Authors’ Response

by Coleman Nye and Sherine Hamdy We are simply thrilled to have Lissa so thoughtfully reviewed by this amazing group of scholar-artists. We want to first thank each of the reviewers for so generously reflecting on this project and for considering it on its own terms. Their responses are more than we could have hoped […]

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The Stakes for Immigration and Mental Health

by Allison Bloom As we sat in the back office of a crisis center, Rosa recounted her darkest moment. An immigrant from Ecuador working a low-wage job, Rosa was facing seemingly insurmountable abuse from her husband. With few language skills, resources, or support, she had contemplated suicide as her only means of escape. Yet as […]

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Competing Agendas: Health Insurance Reform and Precision Medicine

By Emily Hammad Mrig When she was diagnosed with breast cancer, Christy was suddenly confronted with numerous decisions about what to do next. Among the many decisions she had to make, Christy had to choose between a breast conserving surgery or a more invasive bilateral mastectomy to remove the cancerous tissue. Fearing a future cancer […]

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Book Forum: Ed Yong’s I Contain Multitudes

Last summer, popular science writer Ed Yong published his book on the microbiome to great acclaim. The book, I Contain Multitudes: the Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life, became a bestseller and showed up on countless “Best of” book lists for 2016. Since many medical anthropologists work on topics that either touch upon […]

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Multitudes without Politics

by Matthew Wolf-Meyer Microbial science may be the new solutionism in science and medicine. It’s hard not to see the last several years of hullaballoo over the microbiome as not an extension of scientific panacea-seeking from the late 20th and early 21st centuries: first cracking and cataloging the genome would solve all our health problems, […]

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Why Liberals Love the Microbiome

by Jamie Lorimer Ed Yong has written a lovely book. He takes us into the new science of the microbiome, introducing the key ideas and the central players. His writing is clear, compelling and self-effacing. His enthusiasm for his subject and his characters is infectious. His book has been well received; achieving bestseller status, rave […]

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